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Engaging Physicians in Philanthropy

  
  
  

Recent giving trends are showing that individuals are ready to do more. As a result healthcare fundraisers need to think strategically about how to engage individual donors. Physicians can help provide an important link between the patient and the institution.

PhysiciansInFundraising

Let’s take a quick look at some numbers, trends and certain steps on how to involve physicians in your fundraising efforts.

For the fourth consecutive year giving by Americans has grown, says a recent report by Giving USA. Total giving reached $335.17 billion in 2013, a 4.4 percent increase in current dollars with the health subsector receiving the fifth-largest share of charitable dollars in 2013, at 10 percent of the total. Giving to health organizations increased 6 percent in 2013, totaling $31.86 billion.

What is particularly interesting is that 73 percent of the growth in giving from 2011 to 2013 came from individuals. The closest behind individual giving is foundation giving, which contributed 15 percent of total giving in 2013: A trend most relevant for the healthcare sector fundraisers to watch and act upon.  

The steady flow of contributions to health in 2013 and recent years reflects donors’ commitment to such causes as researching vital cures, supporting hospitals and other medical facilities.  However, a commitment of the CEOs and the governing board to increase philanthropic revenue will be key as the industry continues to work with shrinking budgets. Add to that the impact of the Affordable Care Act, ongoing hospital consolidation and the perception of healthcare as “corporate” and you may find your efforts unattainable. With a strategic approach in engaging physicians in your philanthropic aspirations you can bridge the gap between your institution and the individual donors.   

Below, we list a few common mistakes when engaging physicians, as well as a few recommendations on how to better engage them in your fundraising efforts.

Common Mistakes When Engaging Physicians

  • Creating unreasonable expectations

  • Stressing their importance and participation with no plan for engagement

  • Lack of follow up to even the smallest next action step

How To Go About It?

  • Foundations should engage with physicians early in the game

  • Stress fundraising as an “institutional responsibility” but also that can fund physicians’ projects

  • Educate about the role of development or foundation in pursuing gift support for the institution

  • Emphasize that successful fundraising depends upon the involvement of many, including physicians

  • Point out fundraising successes / case studies where physician colleagues were involved

What has your experience been engaging physicians in the philanthropic effort? Leave a comment below or contact Adam Wilhelm, Senior Consultant, Campbell & Company.

About the Campbell & Company Healthcare Practice 

The Campbell & Company Healthcare Team are experts in healthcare philanthropy and staff management. We understand the context in which healthcare organizations operate, and create a structure and process within that context, tailored to your community, that allows philanthropy to grow. For 37 years, we have helped hundreds of healthcare institutions succeed in growing and sustaining their programs.

Campbell & Company maintains offices in Chicago, Los Angeles, Portland, the San Francisco Bay Area, Seattle and Washington, DC. For more information, please telephone (877) 957-0000 toll free, email info@campbellcompany.com or visit www.campbellcompany.com.

Balanced Scorecard: Aligning Resources and Process with Outcomes

  
  
  

Ever wonder whether your organization’s activities are in sync with your mission and vision? It is common for organizations to know where they want to be without knowing how to get there. Ever get push back from staff, who question the strategy behind their action items? If you answer “yes” to any of these questions, then you might consider creating and using a balanced scorecard.

Carrie Dahlquist, Director of Strategic Information Services, for Campbell & Company takes aBalancedScorecardNonprofit moment to discuss the benefits of developing scorecards. But first, let’s take a look at the roots of the concept and its purpose.

What is Balanced Scorecard?
The term “balanced scorecard” grew out of performance measurement work at General Electric in the 1950s and was refined in the 1990s by Drs. Robert Kaplan and David Norton as a performance measurement tool that included strategic non-financial performance measures and traditional financial metrics.

In addition to being a strategic planning and management process, the balanced scorecard is used to streamline the vision of the organization with its business activities.

A balanced scorecard can be used as a management tool to evaluate performance and motivate staff. It can ensure that you are spending manpower and financial resources in a way that can yield the most impact. In essence, the scorecard allows you develop razor-like clarity for prioritizing activities and transforming them into outcomes.

So, How Do you Develop Balanced Scorecard?
Start with Perspectives. The key to developing the balanced scorecard is to identify activities that support the organization’s mission and vision and can be tracked and measured. These activities fall into four perspectives: financial, stakeholders, operations and learning/growth and are based on the mission and vision of the organization. To help develop a scorecard that is most effective, the organization begins the process by asking questions like:

  • What financial steps are necessary to execute strategy?
  • Who are the constituents, and how can they be engaged?
  • What technology can improve and streamline processes?
  • What learning and growth tools will help our staff complete their initiatives?

The balanced scorecard process involves a series of steps to help an organization come up with its own unique approach to answering these questions. It empowers an organization to align its daily operations with its mission and vision and develop measurable goals to move forward deliberately.

The outcome of the exercise is a laser-focused “roadmap”, with objectives, targets, and metrics, which help an organization communicate where it wants to go and how it wants to get there. Some examples could include:

  • Grow financial diversity by targeting 20 new planned gifts each year through a new planned giving partner program.
  • Maximize stakeholder participation by targeting 100 peer-to-peer solicitations through an outreach and engagement committee.
  • Reduce the number of sick days taken by 20% through a new flex work policy.

Specific metrics should be measurable and repeatable, with a mix of leading (relates to inputs) and lagging (relates to outputs) indicators.

Implementing the Balanced Scorecard
Because the balanced scorecard process is comprehensive, organizations considering the approach should make sure they have the resources needed to be successful. In addition to a dedicated project manager who can move the process forward there needs to be a project champion who has strong organization-wide influence.

And while the organization’s leadership should provide direction and support, Ms. Dahlquist stresses that different roles and vantage points are critical, so it is important to be thoughtful in selection of the project team, which should include both management and staff.

Goals should “cascade down”, starting at the organizational level, then by department, team and the individual. Staff performance reviews should reflect completion of specific scoreboard action items.

Implementing a balanced scorecard requires organizational commitment and can involve significant time to develop. To ensure that the scorecard doesn’t reside (and stagnate) in management’s office, the project must be relevant and accessible. Metrics and results should be collected, analyzed, reported and archived regularly. Stakeholders should have ready access to data and use analytics to make continual adjustments and improvements monthly or quarterly. This helps foster the dialogue and establish a higher level of transparency.

Putting this process in place encourages stakeholders to consider how individual roles help drive the success of the organization as a whole—a crucial component for all organizations in achieving their vision, and fulfilling their mission.

Want to learn more? Contact Carrie Dahlquist, Director of Strategic Information Services, or listen to a recent webinar on Creating and Managing Balanced Scorecards.

About Campbell & Company

Campbell & Company is a national consulting firm offering advancement planning, fundraising, communications and executive search services for nonprofit organizations in the education, health and medicine, arts and culture, environment, social service, and professional society fields.

Through thirty-plus years and thousands of engagements, we have helped nonprofit organizations anticipate and manage the challenges of the philanthropic marketplace. With offices around the country, Campbell & Company brings you the benefits of local knowledge, and national best practices.

Nonprofit Leaders Respond to Giving USA 2014 Findings

  
  
  

Campbell & Company presented findings and analysis of Giving USA 2014, the annual report on philanthropy, to more than 1,200 nonprofit professionals at a national webinar, a Pacific Northwest webinar hosted by the Collins Group, a division of Campbell & Company, and events in Chicago, Cleveland, Nashville, Washington, DC, Milwaukee and Minneapolis. 

The report found that American philanthropy continued its steady recovery from the Great Recession in 2013 and is on track to return to pre-recession levels as soon as 2014. Event panelists and participants shared success stories and challenges from the past year, focusing in on factors that may affect organizations’ success in the long-term as philanthropy continues to recover, such as navigating corporate giving programs, building membership and crafting strong cases of support that speak to donors on all levels.  

Below, we summarize key insights shared in our national webinar and events.

Common Challenges

While success stories were prevalent this year, many panelists and participants described the various challenges involved in organizational growth, including maintaining donor relationships, navigating new partnerships, communicating effectively with new constituents and continuing to build urgent and compelling cases for private support. Others described the difficult balancing act of aligning human capital with philanthropic goals, including appropriately leveraging different giving sources (individual, corporate, foundation, etc.) and not creating an over-reliance on one area of support.

Keys to Success

Organizational representatives described steps their institutions had taken to ensure their sustainability and growth over the past year, including:

  • Offering more opportunities than ever for donors to give, including layered initiatives

  • Maintaining a donor-centered focus in which organizations listen closely to their constituents and respond to their interests, motivations and needs

  • Building long-lasting philanthropic relationships with key individual and institutional donors to ensure mutual benefit—and ensuring these relationships are organizationally, not personally, held

  • Crafting a powerful yet flexible case for support, including concrete and relatable evidence of organizational impact, that can be tailored for distinct constituencies

A Look to the Long-Term

Panelists had encouraging words about philanthropy’s continued recovery as well as organizational and sector-specific growth. However, they cautioned their peers not to lose sight of the longer-term downward trend in government funding for nonprofits and implored attendees to continue focusing on cultivating strong donor relationships in the private sector.

Campbell & Company thanks all of the organizations and non-profit leaders for their involvement in the Giving USA events. Click here for a list of all of the events.

Click here to listen to Campbell & Company’s Giving USA 2014 webinar.

About Campbell & Company
Campbell & Company is a national consulting firm offering advancement planning, fundraising, marketing communications and executive search services to nonprofit organizations in nearly every sector. Through thirty-eight years and more than a couple thousand engagements, we helped our clients anticipate and manage the challenges of the philanthropic marketplace. Our offices are located in Chicago, Portland, Los Angeles, the San Francisco Bay Area, Seattle, and Washington, DC. For more information, please visit www.campbellcompany.com.  

About Giving USA Foundation™

Giving USA is a public outreach initiative of Giving USA Foundation™, which was established by the Giving Institute to advance philanthropy through research and education. Headquartered in Chicago, the Foundation publishes data and trends about charitable giving through its seminal publication, Giving USA, which has documented who gives what to whom for more than 50 years, and quarterly newsletters on philanthropy-related topics. To learn more visit www.givinginstitute.org.

How to obtain Giving USA 2014

Giving USA is the most up to date and comprehensive report on American philanthropy. The Giving USA 2014 Reports Highlights can be downloaded FREE online at www.givingusareports.org. Other products include the complete report – now available in paperback; a “Giving USA Spotlight;” the Giving USA data tables; and a digital package, which includes a graph pack of PowerPoint slides for board meetings. Use code: GI1430 to receive 30% off. A limited run of the 2010, 2011, and 2012 complete report in paperback is also available!

Performance Metrics – Beyond The Visits

  
  
  

In her landmark college text on fundraising, “Effective Fund-Raising Management”, Dr. Kathleen Kelly - Winner of the 1998 Staley/Robeson/Ryan/St. Lawrence Prize for Research on Fund-Raising and Philanthropy - states, “The third most important issue facing fundraising - following the need to define who is a fundraiser and to reduce misunderstanding about philanthropy – is how the function should be evaluated.”  Performance Metrics

For decades following the formal establishment of development as a staff function in the 1970’s, managers have struggled with how to establish performance goals that helped fundraisers successfully reach the objectives  of their nonprofit organizations.  Because fundraising is not an exact science, and because people make major philanthropic commitments for their reasons and not the organization’s (that’s why we call them gifts), most fundraising managers established target dollar goals with the charge of “Get out there and do the best you can.” 

Since then three things have happened to change that approach: 1) abuse in fundraising costs and gift counting has triggered greater scrutiny of the nonprofit sector at the state and federal level; 2) major and planned giving development positions focused on working with high value prospects now command the highest non-management salaries and are in great demand; and 3) the Great Recession has forced boards and managers to pay more attention to efficiencies (return on investment and dollars raised per budget dollars spent) which has created greater emphasis on performance metrics. 

Unfortunately, despite these changes, many nonprofit managers have established performance metrics for gift officers focused solely on visits, proposals and dollars raised.  That means that an effective major and planned gift officer who is involved in many important prospecting and cultivation activities would only get credit for about 20% of their work each month.  These metrics then become punitive and discouraging, not motivating.

Core Principals of Major and Planned Giving Programs

Harvard University Director of Training and Education Anne T. Melvin helped the University’s vast major and planned giving program develop new performance metrics by establishing these core principles:

  • Align the development officer’s personal metrics with goals of the organization and its development office

  • Only incentivize activity that is in a development officer’s control

  • Use carrots and not sticks to motivate  

Obviously the needs of an immature or emerging development shop are much different than those of a mature program that raises millions of dollars each year at a large institution.  So the first job for leadership is to determine who you are and what you need – beyond money.  Young and emerging fundraising programs will place much greater emphases on identifying, qualifying and engaging new prospective donors so performance metrics should be established to reflect that activity.  Mature development offices will focus much more on significant moves for each fundraiser’s Top 25 high value prospects with a greater percentage of activity devoted to solicitation. 

Moving From Ignorance to Investment

While an individual’s final giving decision is not in a development officer’s control as stated earlier, American philanthropy has been around long enough that we now have a great deal of research available on why people make large gifts.  These decisions are all fundamentally based on an individual’s belief in the mission of the organization and their desire to make a difference and leave a legacy based on their own personal experiences.  Therefore, each development office should define what it considers to be the activity, in the development officer’s control, that would best move a prospective donor along the emotional continuum from ignorance to investment.  This activity, termed “significant moves” in the fundraising industry, could consist of the following:

  • Prospect visited for the first time – the “discovery call”

  • Send more information to prospects about their interest areas

  • Prospect attends an event

  • 2nd visit

  • Prospect hosts an event

  • Meet the CEO

  • Join a committee

  • Meet with another volunteer

  • 3rd visit

  • Tour the campus/facility

  • Solicit

  • Send a proposal

  • Close the gift

  • Apply appropriate recognition

    It is also important to define things that are not considered significant moves which would include things like – sending a holiday card, sending an email blast along with 200 others, chatting with prospect at an event, sending a hand-written thank you note, etc.

    Finally, in order for development officers to be rewarded and motivated by their personal performance metrics, all significant moves must be entered into a central fundraising database system.  This requires the diligence of the development officer to enter the information consistently and on time and it also requires some time from a database manager or prospect researcher to monitor this input and to generate reports for managers to use in quarterly update meetings with fundraisers.  Any performance metrics program will die a slow death if this database use and support is not put in place.

    We welcome your comments below. Want to learn more? Contact Bruce Matthews, Vice President.

    Campbell & Company is a national consulting firm offering advancement planning, fundraising, communications and executive search services for nonprofit organizations in the education, health and medicine, arts and culture, environment, social service, and professional society fields.

    Through thirty-seven years and thousands of engagements, Campbell & Company has helped nonprofit organizations anticipate and manage the challenges of the philanthropic marketplace. The company maintains offices in Chicago, Los Angeles, Portland, the San Francisco Bay Area, Seattle, and Washington, DC. For more information, please visit www.campbellcompany.com.

    Giving USA Higher Education Snapshot

      
      
      

    The recently released Giving USA 2014 report describes broad trends in higher education philanthropy. Total giving reached $335.17 billion in 2013, a 4.4 percent increase in current dollars and a 3.0 percent increase in inflation-adjusted dollars. The education subsector received the second-largest share of charitable dollars in 2013, at 16 percent of the total.  

    Here, we break down important trends from the report and make broad recommendations for higher education institutions as they build their fundraising programs. We welcome your thoughts and questions; please don’t hesitate to contact Bruce Matthews, Patrick Johnson and James Plourde.  

    GivingUSA2

    Key Findings

    • Giving to the education subsector amounted to 16 percent of total giving in 2013.

    • Contributions to education organizations rose 8.9 percent between 2012 and 2013 to $52.07 billion.

    • The estimate for giving to the education subsector in 2013 includes two mega-gifts totaling $293 million that went to U.S.-based universities.

    • Compared with all other charitable subsectors, giving to education organizations has seen the most positive growth since the end of the Great Recession in 2009.

    • Donors to education increasingly supported capital purposes over current operations at higher education institutions in 2013, according to the Council for Aid to Education (CAE). In addition, alumni giving showed the strongest growth among all donor types to these institutions in 2013.

    We recommend that higher education institutions:

    • Build a “high impact” fundraising program: Fundraising programs should focus on securing leadership and major gifts. Doing so requires strategic investment in fundraising staff and systems, as well as training for leadership, staff and volunteers; however, such a program almost always provides the greatest return on investment.

    • Develop a powerful case for support: With the continuing government support cuts higher education institutions should develop clear, concise and consistent case that describes their vision, impact and need for philanthropic support. Stakeholders at all levels should contribute to the development of case messages and be prepared to share them with a range of prospective supporters.

    • Engage students as lifelong donors: Students have been critical but often neglected segment of philanthropists. Results of a recent study support the notion that more resources, programming, and integrated activity related to student giving can nurture philanthropic engagement among students, which in turn can create a foundation for future fundraising success.

    We welcome your comments below. Want to learn more? Contact Bruce Matthews, Vice President, Patrick Johnson, Senior Consultant and James Plourde at Campbell & Company and the Collins Group, a division of Campbell & Company.

    About the Campbell & Company Higher Education Practice

    The Campbell & Company Higher Education Team understands the context in which higher education institutions operate, and create a structure and process within that context, tailored to your community, that allows philanthropy to grow. For 37 years, we have successfully partnered with a range of higher education institutions, including large public universities, mid-majors, private liberal arts colleges and community colleges. We also draw on our staffs’ experience to develop initiatives for specific higher education segments including Historically Black Colleges and Universities and professional schools.

    Campbell & Company maintains offices in Chicago, Los Angeles, Portland, the San Francisco Bay Area, Seattle and Washington, DC. For more information, please telephone (877) 957-0000 toll free, email info@campbellcompany.com or visit www.campbellcompany.com.

    Giving USA Healthcare Snapshot

      
      
      

    The recently released Giving USA 2014 report describes broad trends in healthcare philanthropy. Total giving reached $335.17 billion in 2013, a 4.4 percent increase in current dollars and a 3.0 percent increase in inflation-adjusted dollars.

    Here, we break down important trends from the report and make broad recommendations for healthcare organizations as they build their fundraising programs. We welcome your thoughts and questions; please don’t hesitate to contact Adam Wilhelm at adam.wilhelm@campbellcompany.com

    GUSA2

    Key Findings

    • The health subsector received the fifth-largest share of charitable dollars in 2013, at 10 percent of the total.

    • Giving to health organizations grew 6 percent in 2013, totaling $31.86 billion.

    • Since the end of the Great Recession in 2009, giving to health organizations realized a moderately healthy increase in contributions. Between 2009 and 2013, giving to these organizations rose 12.5 percent in inflation-adjusted dollars.

    • The steady flow of contributions to health in 2013 and recent years reflects donors’ commitment to such causes as researching cures for cancer or paralysis, supporting hospitals and other medical facilities, and buttressing health policy initiatives.

    We recommend that healthcare organizations:

    • Build a “high impact” fundraising program:  Fundraising programs should focus on securing leadership and major gifts, in addition to implementing and growing a Grateful Patient Program. Doing so requires strategic investment in fundraising staff and systems, as well as training for leadership, staff and volunteers; however, such a program almost always provides the greatest returns for hospitals, healthcare systems and other healthcare providers.

    • Develop a powerful case for support:  With the continued uncertainty in the healthcare sector, organizations must develop a clear, concise and consistent case that describes their vision, impact and need for philanthropic support. Stakeholders at all level should contribute to the development of case messages and be prepared to share them with a range of prospective supporters.

    • Engage physicians in fundraising efforts: In today’s healthcare environment, physicians may be the most solid link between the patient and the institution. Development staff should plan for a long-term program and engage physicians in the fundraising effort for their participation is vital to legitimize philanthropic aspirations internally and externally. Learn more in our next blog post. 

    We welcome your comments below. Want to learn more? Contact Adam Wilhelm, Senior Consultant, Campbell & Company.

    About the Campbell & Company Healthcare Practice 

    The Campbell & Company Healthcare Team are experts in healthcare philanthropy and staff management. We understand the context in which healthcare organizations operate, and create a structure and process within that context, tailored to your community, that allows philanthropy to grow. For 37 years, we have helped hundreds of healthcare institutions succeed in growing and sustaining their programs.

    Campbell & Company maintains offices in Chicago, Los Angeles, Portland, the San Francisco Bay Area, Seattle and Washington, DC. For more information, please telephone (877) 957-0000 toll free, email info@campbellcompany.com or visit www.campbellcompany.com.


    American Giving Continues To Grow, Near Pre-recession Levels

      
      
      

    Americans gave an estimated $335.17 billion to charitable causes in 2013, representing 4.4 percent growth (3.0 percent adjusted for inflation) from the previous year, according to Giving USA 2014: The Annual Report on Philanthropy. This continues the trend of steady growth that we have observed since the recession, and Giving USA is optimistic that as soon as next year giving should return to pre-2008 levels.

    "Philanthropy continues to rebound within the larger economic climate; growth is steady across most giving sectors. The strong health of the stock market has given rise to large gifts from individuals to their charities of choice.  As always, there are opportunities for nonprofit organizations that manage their operations effectively and build a compelling case for philanthropy.” says Peter Fissinger, President & Chief Executive Officer of Campbell & Company, a national fundraising consulting and executive search firm. "By continuing to strategically build relationships with their best donors and prospects, nonprofits can help ensure their sustainability and growth both now and in the future."

    Other key findings from Giving USA 2013 include:

    Giving by Source

    GivingbySource

    • Individual giving rose to $240.60 billion, a 4.2 percent increase (2.7 percent adjusted for inflation) over 2012. This figure was bolstered by continued economic improvement, including the 27.8 percent growth of the S&P 500—compared to an 11.1 increase from 2011 to 2012—growth in personal and disposable income, and a modest drop in the unemployment rate.

    • Corporate giving, including cash gifts, in-kind contributions, and corporate foundation grants and gifts, was the only source that did not show growth last year, declining 1.9 percent from 2013 to 2012 and totaling $17.88 billion. However, since extenuating factors such as significant in-kind gifts from major pharmaceutical companies drove an appreciable portion of corporate giving’s 16.9 percent growth in 2012, this year’s slight decline is understandable.

    Giving by Sector

    GUSASectors

    About Giving USA Foundation™

    Giving USA is a public outreach initiative of Giving USA Foundation™, which was established by the Giving Institute to advance philanthropy through research and education. Headquartered in Chicago, the Foundation publishes data and trends about charitable giving through its seminal publication, Giving USA, which has documented who gives what to whom for more than 50 years, and quarterly newsletters on philanthropy-related topics. To learn more visit www.givinginstitute.org.

    How to obtain Giving USA 2014

    Giving USA is the most up to date and comprehensive report on American philanthropy. The Giving USA 2014 Reports Highlights can be downloaded FREE online at www.givingusareports.org. Other products include the complete report – now available in paperback; a “Giving USA Spotlight;” the Giving USA data tables; and a digital package, which includes a graph pack of PowerPoint slides for board meetings. Use code: GI1430 to receive 30% off. A limited run of the 2010, 2011, and 2012 complete report in paperback is also available!

    Join the Conversation!

    You can follow and join in the conversation on Twitter using the tag #GivingUSA2014.  

    Campbell & Company is holding Giving USA programs in Chicago, Cleveland, Los Angeles, Milwaukee, Minnesota, Nashville, and Washington, DC, as well as a national webinar.

    To learn more about our events, click here

    Campbell & Company is a national consulting firm offering advancement planning, fundraising, communications and executive search services for nonprofit organizations in the education, health and medicine, arts and culture, environment, social service, and professional society fields.

    Through thirty-seven years and thousands of engagements, Campbell & Company has helped nonprofit organizations anticipate and manage the challenges of the philanthropic marketplace. The company maintains offices in Chicago, Los Angeles, Portland, the San Francisco Bay Area, Seattle, and Washington, DC. For more information, please visit www.campbellcompany.com.

    Adam Wilhelm Quoted in Argus Leader on Medical Foundations Strategy Change

      
      
      
    More and more health systems have been relying on fundraising and philanthropy to bridge the budget gap created as a result of the challenging financial environment. 

    Argus Leader turned to Adam Wilhelm of Campbell & Company for his take on the strategies health systems have been employing.

    “We’re continuing to hear, especially from hospital and health system CEOs, that they’re increasingly looking to their foundations and philanthropy departments not to help them completely close the gap but to help them close the gap a little more because they’re looking at cutting budgets as a result of changing funding,” said Adam Wilhelm, a Chicago-based senior consultant for Campbell & Company who works with health care clients on philanthropy.

    As a result hospitals and health systems are:
    • Adding staff to foundations because there’s a return on investment that can’t be found anywhere else in the enterprise
    • Many foundations have shifted from a focus on events to honing in on one-on-one donor development to bring in larger amounts.
    Read the complete interview here.

    About the Campbell & Company Healthcare Practice 

    The Campbell & Company Healthcare Team are experts in healthcare philanthropy and staff management. We understand the context in which healthcare organizations operate, and create a structure and process within that context, tailored to your community, that allows philanthropy to grow. For 37 years, we have helped hundreds of healthcare institutions succeed in growing and sustaining their programs.

    Campbell & Company maintains offices in Chicago, Los Angeles, Portland, the San Francisco Bay Area, Seattle and Washington, DC. For more information, please telephone (877) 957-0000 toll free, email info@campbellcompany.com or visit www.campbellcompany.com.

    Engage Students Now To Become Lifelong Donors

      
      
      

    The Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE) and Campbell & Company released the findings of a joint global survey focused on development and alumni relations professionals at higher education institutions of every type to gather perspectives and best practices on a critical but often neglected area: student philanthropy. 

    Students as Lifelong Donors

    For a majority of the 211 institutions surveyed, investment in student philanthropy can be characterized by limited financial resources, minimal staffing, and lackluster efforts at student engagement. Other results from the survey suggest a silver lining: increased organizational dedication to engaging students as donors through a variety of practices can lay the foundation for better long-term fundraising outcomes. 

    “We view this as the beginning of an important dialogue. Not enough emphasis has been placed on the value—and potential value—of student philanthropy programs,” says Peter Fissinger, President and CEO of Campbell & Company. “We’ve only begun to examine whether and how we can help shape lifelong donors to colleges and universities. We hope others join the conversation and help pursue additional research uncovering the best practices for investing in and monitoring student programs, and connecting these programs to strong alumni giving programs.” 

    Key findings include:

    • More than two-thirds of the institutions surveyed have a staff working group or a campus organization dedicated to student philanthropy, but 24 percent reported that efforts to engage students are sporadic. Nearly one in 10 institutions had no activity in student philanthropy at all.

    • Only 13 percent of advancement professionals rated their institutions as having a high or very high degree of success in engagement with students as lifelong donors

    • Most institutions invest little in student philanthropy. During the most recent fiscal year, nearly half of the institutions surveyed allocated $2,500 or less to student philanthropy. Only 30 percent dedicate more than $5,000 annually.

    • Institutions that spent less than 50 cents per enrollee received gifts from just 2.8 percent of the student body in the past year, but institutions that spent more saw much higher participation rates—10.9 percent of students gave.

    • Getting feedback from all types of stakeholders-- administration leadership, students, and other campus constituents--was associated with an average increase of 2.5 percentage points in current student donor rates.

    Read the complete report here.

    About CASE

    The Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE)  is a professional association serving educational institutions and the advancement professionals who work on their behalf in alumni relations, communications, development, marketing and allied areas.

    About the Campbell & Company Higher Education Practice

    The Campbell & Company Higher Education Team understands the context in which higher education institutions operate, and create a structure and process within that context, tailored to your community, that allows philanthropy to grow. For 37 years, we have successfully partnered with a range of higher education institutions, including large public universities, mid-majors, private liberal arts colleges and community colleges. We also draw on our staffs’ experience to develop initiatives for specific higher education segments including Historically Black Colleges and Universities and professional schools.

    Campbell & Company maintains offices in Chicago, Los Angeles, Portland, the San Francisco Bay Area, Seattle and Washington, DC. For more information, please telephone (877) 957-0000 toll free, email info@campbellcompany.com or visit www.campbellcompany.com.  

    Are Philanthropic Values Taught? Engaging the Young Donor

      
      
      

    Young PhilanthropistsI recently found myself in a discussion with an experienced and generous philanthropist about younger donors. This person was frustrated with some younger entrepreneurs in his community who have significant wealth but are not involving themselves in the community the way he and other civic leaders believe is responsible.  And so he asked me how philanthropic values are taught, and whether young people today hold the same philanthropic values found in prior generations. 

    Here’s some of what we know: evidence suggests young people, when we account for wealth and education (two significant indicators of giving), are as generous as any generation in history.  In 2008, Campbell & Company partnered with the Lilly School of Philanthropy at Indiana University (which was then called The Center on Philanthropy at Indiana University) to better understand charitable giving across different generations. The research found that while giving does differ from generation to generation, each generational cohort still has a strong propensity to give.

    We at Campbell & Company are encouraged by the enthusiasm we see among young volunteers and donors at many institutions with which we work. Interestingly, there does appear to be important differences in how some young donors and volunteers operate. Some of the differences, regarding independent behavior, seem connected to the evolution of the virtual world, where there is no one dominant voice but instead ongoing dialogue among virtual communities of people. And because of this, nonprofits, to some degree, have less control over their brand and messaging. The benefit, however, is that young donors are viral; they can become some of your most powerful advocates.

    We also know that philanthropic behavior is learned. In my discussion with the philanthropist, to which I referred earlier, he told me he and his wife are matching gifts 4-1 which their children make to nonprofit organizations of their choice. Naturally, their children are giving more now.  And recently, Campbell & Company funded research at the Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE) examining the impact of student focused philanthropic programs (to be released in the May/June 2014 CASE Currents edition). As might be expected, institutions who invested in student philanthropy programs tended to have more generous and involved younger alumni. 

    Some behaviors, such as short-term giving, found in younger donors may be a result of inexperience.  And, in time, they will most likely moderate certain aspects of their philanthropy to fit longer-term norms. Engaging with this generation is an important strategy for the longevity of nonprofits across the US. It’s important to be bullish on young people and their desire to be generous. 

    By Peter Fissinger, President and CEO, Campbell & Company 

    About Campbell & Company

    Campbell & Company is a national consulting firm offering advancement planning, fundraising, communications and executive search services for nonprofit organizations in the education, health and medicine, arts and culture, environment, social service, and professional society fields.

    Through thirty-plus years and thousands of engagements, we have helped nonprofit organizations anticipate and manage the challenges of the philanthropic marketplace. With offices around the country, Campbell & Company brings you the benefits of local knowledge, and national best practices.

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