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Dan Nevez

Dan Nevez is a Senior Consultant, Executive Search at Campbell & Company, with a primary focus in senior and C-suite level search for mission-oriented organizations. He works to identify high-performing candidates from diverse communities and sectors in order to place the right leader.

Recently, I wrote an article about the growing number of pay equity laws designed to correct gender- and race-based disparities in compensation. The post focused on California’s ban on asking about salary history and offered compensation policy advice for nonprofit executives navigating this evolving landscape.

Campbell & Company supports these legislative efforts, and we believe similar laws will continue to take shape across the U.S. While organizations seek guidance amidst this change, jobseekers need their own set of do’s and don’ts. How can I prepare? What can I ask? How much should I share?

Talent Management, Talent Management Strategies, Executive Search, West Region, Career Advice, Blog

Delaware. San Francisco. Massachusetts. Philadelphia. New York City. Pay equity legislation is popping up across the nation. These laws aim to correct gender- and race-based disparities in pay. In 2017 alone, 40 U.S. jurisdictions considered legislation to address the gender wage gap.[1] 

Earlier this year, New Jersey passed the Diane B. Allen Equal Pay Act, bolstering protections against employment discrimination for protected classes.[2] As of January 1, 2018, employers in California can no longer ask job candidates about their salary history—an effort to ensure wage discrimination does not follow people from position to position.[3]  

Talent Management, Talent Management Strategies, Executive Search, West Region, Blog


In my experience with senior and C-suite level executive search, I have had the opportunity to look at various ways organizations aim to attract and retain talent. In an increasingly competitive market for fundraising talent, organizations have implemented performance incentive programs – which provide ways to increase pay beyond base salary – to boost their compensation packages. The questions often asked of me, however, is whether incentive programs are ethical or effective, and if so, how do they work. After conducting informal research, which consisted of asking peer nonprofit leaders for their thoughts on the topic, it became clear that there was an opportunity to further explore this area and understand more about how these reward programs work.   Particularly, healthcare institutions have found that performance incentive programs do encourage fundraising staff to meet goals.

Nonprofit Trends, Talent Management Strategies, Healthcare Trends, Campbell & Company Research Findings, Executive Search, West Region