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Facebook Tests New Donate Feature

  
  
  

facebook what would i say app defaultToday Facebook unveiled a new feature to help nonprofits raise money this holiday season.

Nineteen nonprofits, including the American Red Cross, Livestrong Foundation, and Unicef, now have the ability to receive donations through their Facebook page with a donation feature. 

When supporters land on a charity’s Facebook page, they can select the “donate now” button, enter the amount they want to give and their payment information, and share the fact that they gave through their news feed.

According to Facebook 100 percent of the online contributions will go directly to charity.

Facebook plans to offer the donate button to all nonprofits soon. The reactions from the fundraising community are varied. Read the complete article.

Eight Important Trends Impacting Development in Higher Education

  
  
  
higher edu trendsDr. Loren Anderson, whose career has spanned three institutions, seven development campaigns, and almost $500 million in fundraising, shares his observations on development trends that are impacting higher education.

During his 20-year term as President of Pacific Lutheran University (PLU) in Parkland, Washington, the university gained national stature in global education, sustainability, and helping students explore their passion and purpose in life and their role as world citizens. Dr. Anderson holds a B.A. degree from Concordia College in Moorhead, MN; an M.A. in speech from Michigan State University; and a Ph.D. from the University of Michigan in communication theory and research. 

As a spokesperson for private higher education, Dr. Anderson served as a member and board chair of the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities and of the Independent Colleges of Washington. He served as a board member of the Council of Independent Colleges, the American Council on Education, and the Institute for the International Education of Students. 

1. Donor pyramids are taller and narrower.

The 80-20 donor pyramid of giving that once described development campaigns has given way to a 90-10, sometimes a 95-5, model. This change reflects the concentration of wealth and donor capacity in our society. For example, The 50 donors on The Chronicle of Philanthropy’s annual list of the most generous Americans gave an average of $61 million in 2011, compared with $39.6 million the previous year. Collectively, these philanthropists gave $10.4 billion to charitable organizations in 2012.

In the past, donors who would make a $100,000 gift would be likely to make the same contribution over the next three to five years. “Now there are fewer larger long-term pledge gifts and more smaller one-time gifts,” indicates Dr. Anderson, “We are also seeing a decline in middle range gifts in the amount of $25,000 to $200,000.”  

Establishing significant relationships with those donors who have the capacity to make very large gifts is thus more important than ever. “Organizations need to focus and carefully prioritize major gift work, as the success of development campaigns increasingly depends on this small and very generous group of donors,” says Dr. Anderson.

2. Fewer donors are willing to make large 3 to 5 year pledges.

The dramatic economic swings of the past two decades have impacted donor confidence in the future and, as a result, more major gift donors are choosing to make one-time significant gifts – rather than a three to five year pledge. This is especially true for donors who fund their contributions from annual earnings, as opposed to accumulated assets.  

As Dr. Anderson notes, “this trend toward one-time gifts and away from multi-year pledges, contributes to the taller/narrower donor pyramid described earlier, as the mid-major gifts in the $25,000 range and up become more difficult to find.”  

3. Donors are reserving their significant gifts for institutions and organizations with whom they have truly significant relationships.

Donors are increasingly concentrating their significant giving to those organizations they feel most strongly about, as opposed to spreading their giving across a larger number of nonprofits, a trend which commentators have attributed to shifts in the economic climate and philanthropic culture. 

“Nonprofits used to expect that donors who gave once would give again, but that has changed as philanthropy has become a more important part of our culture,” he explains. “People with resources are used to being approached by many organizations and they must make choices. They’ll quite naturally choose the organizations they know best and feel most closely toward.”  

4. Donor designations are more frequent and more precise.

“Donors increasingly want to designate their gifts to a specific project or cause,” explains Dr. Anderson. “Instead of supporting the next capital project, they want to see the impact their support has for beneficiaries like individual students or children.”  

This trend changes the structure of campaigns. Campaigns can really package a series of individual projects like a building, endowment, and scholarships. Nonprofits and their development teams need to review their campaign planning and let donors choose specific projects as opposed to making broad appeals.

5. Women are playing a much larger role, as donors and as leaders.  Couples are making joint decisions about their philanthropy.  Charities are behind the curve.

Women are more involved in the world of philanthropy as board members, volunteers and development professionals. Most importantly, the number of women donors has increased. A study by the Lilly Family School of Philanthropy - Women Give 2010 - found that women at all income levels have the desire and capacity for giving and do give frequently. For instance, of 2,500 households headed by single males or single females, the women were more likely to donate and almost always gave more.

Couples’ philanthropic decision making has also changed. “It used to be that Bill would take Joe to the golf course, and Joe would decide what he and his wife are going to give,” says Dr. Anderson. “Today, couples make philanthropic decisions together, which means nonprofits have to appeal to the values and interests of both persons.”    

6. A new "investment culture" increasingly shapes our attitudes (and behavior) toward philanthropy and our expectations regarding charities.

An increasing number of donors make decisions using a model that considers the “return” on their philanthropic investment. “The attitude that we have about investing for financial return has influenced our attitudes about giving,” says Dr. Anderson. Organizations need to develop stronger cases for philanthropic support, maintain transparency around their budgets and institute professional reporting standards that demonstrate their efficiency and effectiveness.  Donor expectations for more detailed reporting require charities to rethink their management systems, financial management and investment programs.    

7. Volunteer involvement in development work is decreasing while the reliance on professional staff is increasing.

According to the Federal Agency for Service and Volunteering in 2011, the number of volunteers reached its highest level in five years, as 64.3 million Americans volunteered with an organization, an increase of 1.5 million from 2010. But finding effective fundraising volunteers is a growing challenge. “People who will roll up their sleeves and become directly involved in development work are few in number” says Dr. Anderson.  He predicts a continuing trend toward the use of development professionals in lieu of a reduced role for volunteers.  

8. In higher education: loan payments are displacing alumni contributions for a whole generation of younger alums.

Students and their parents struggle with student loans, which recently exceeded a combined total of $1 trillion. In a sluggish economy and job market, loan payments have taken priority over donations. Dr. Anderson feels the philanthropic community has not been sensitive to these trends. “Every time we ask these young graduates for a financial gift, we are asking them to do something they cannot do,” he says, “We are, in a sense, training them to say no to us.”

Dr. Anderson advocates rethinking our approach to young alumni, who very often want to donate their time and expertise as volunteers. Examples may include speaking or helping students find internships. “We need to develop a tradition of saying yes,” he explains, “so that when these alumni are ready and able to give financially, a relationship, and a tradition of “giving” had already been built.”

For a more in-depth look at the higher education industry trends and changes please follow Campbell & Company’s blog and our webinar calendar here.

The Campbell & Company Higher Education Team understands the context in which higher education institutions operate, and create a structure and process within that context, tailored to your community, that allows philanthropy to grow. For 37 years, we have successfully partnered with a range of higher education institutions, including large public universities, mid-majors, private liberal arts colleges and community colleges. We also draw on our staffs’ experience to develop initiatives for specific higher education segments including Historically Black Colleges and Universities and professional schools.

Campbell & Company maintains offices in Chicago, Los Angeles, Portland, the San Francisco Bay Area, and Washington, DC. For more information, please telephone (877) 957-0000 toll free, email info@campbellcompany.com or visit www.campbellcompany.com.  

Giving USA 2013: Live from NPR Studio 1

  
  
  

Washington, DC: Campbell & Company with partner AFP DC recently presented findings and analysis of Giving USA 2013 at NPR’s stunning Studio 1. Monique Hanson and Stacy Palmer Campbell & Company Vice President Jeffrey Wilklow presented key findings from the report to an audience of 100, before panelists Monique Hanson, Chief Development Officer at NPR and Stacy Palmer, Editor, The Chronicle of Philanthropy shared their insights into the report’s implications.

“We are incredibly grateful to NPR for opening their incredible studio to us for the Giving USA 2013 presentation and panel discussion,” said Mr. Wilklow, “and we value the time Monique and Stacy took to share their knowledge and experience. Both are remarkably capable professionals and deep thinkers on all things philanthropic.” 

The FindingsDC Crowd Shot

Giving USA 2013 found that American philanthropy continued its slow but steady recovery from the Great Recession in 2012; event panelists found compelling reasons for optimism. Stacy Palmer observed that high-end giving has largely returned to normal levels and that the continued retirement of the Baby Boomer generation would likely drive future growth in giving. She also described significant growth in online giving (15 percent), which is expected to account for an increasingly significant portion of nonprofits’ philanthropic revenue in coming years.

Key Trends

Monique Hanson described how nonprofit Boards have become more involved in both prospect research and stewardship, and how development staff have grown increasingly statistics driven, relying on analyses of prospect capacity and giving likelihood to prioritize their efforts and a range of metrics to assess their performance. She also summarized NPR’s efforts focusing its development program on the “donor experience,” assigning each key donor and prospect to a single relationship manager to ensure seamless interaction with the network.

A Call to Action

Both panelists described how the nonprofit sector had been a powerful advocate against the charitable deduction cap, which threatened to significantly affect higher-level philanthropic giving, and encouraged organizations to continue raising their voices as debates over tax policy continue. They also urged organizations and individuals to focus on sequestration, the effects of which have not been directly experienced by many organizations. 

If you would like to receive information about Campbell & Company’s future Giving USA events, please visit our website at www.campbellcompany.com and sign up for our email list.

Click here to listen to Campbell & Company’s Giving USA 2013 webinar.

About Campbell & Company
Campbell & Company is a national consulting firm offering advancement planning, fundraising, marketing communications and executive search services to nonprofit organizations in nearly every sector. Through thirty-seven years and more than a thousand engagements, we helped our clients anticipate and manage the challenges of the philanthropic marketplace. Our offices are located in Chicago, Portland, Los Angeles, the San Francisco Bay Area and Washington, DC. For more information, please call toll-free (877) 957-0000, email info@campbellcompany.com or visit www.campbellcompany.com.  

About Giving USA FoundationTM 
Giving USA is a public outreach initiative of Giving USA Foundation™, which was established by the Giving Institute to advance philanthropy through research and education. Headquartered in Chicago, the Foundation publishes data and trends about charitable giving through its seminal publications, GUSA, which has documented who gives what to whom for more than 50 years, and quarterly newsletters on philanthropy-related topics. To learn more, visit www.giviginstitute.org.

How to Obtain Giving USA 2013
Giving USA is the longest running and most comprehensive report on American philanthropy. A free executive summary of Giving USA 2013 can be downloaded online at www.givingusareports.org. Other products include the complete report; Giving USA Spotlight – quarterly research reports; and PowerPoint presentations for board meetings. Use the code CAMS1131 to receive 10% off any Giving USA products.

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American Giving Continues Slow, Consistent Recovery

  
  
  

Americans gave an estimated $316.23 billion to charitable causes in 2012, representing 3.5 percent growth (1.5 percent adjusted for inflation) from the previous year, according to Giving USA 2013: The Annual Report on Philanthropy. While this continues the trend of growth that we have observed since the recession, the current pace suggests that it could take another six to seven years for giving to return to pre-2008 levels. Because giving closely tracks the economy at large, key economic factors (personal income, personal consumption, employment levels and investment markets) could alter this pace and the overall level of giving further.

"Overall, growth in giving was restrained. But there are signs that individuals, the largest source of giving, are beginning to consider more asset-based giving. This development could be quite positive going forward," says Peter Fissinger, President & Chief Executive Officer of Campbell & Company, a national fundraising consulting and executive search firm. "By continuing to strategically build relationships with their best donors and prospects, nonprofits can help ensure their sustainability and growth in these challenging times."

Other key findings from Giving USA 2013 include:

Giving by Source

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  • Individual giving rose to $228.93 billion, a 3.9 percent increase (1.9 percent adjusted for inflation) over 2011. This figure may have been checked by economic uncertainty, which resulted from contrasting positive and negative indicators, including growth in the S&P 500, slightly higher home values, lower unemployment and reduced gas prices coupled with budget and tax reform debates.

  • Corporate giving, including cash gifts, in-kind contributions, and corporate foundation grants and gifts, rose to an estimated $18.15 billion, a 12.2 percent increase (9.9 percent adjusted for inflation) from 2011 levels. Significant in-kind gifts from major pharmaceutical companies drove an appreciable portion of this growth.
     

Giving by Sector

Giving by Sector

About Giving USA Foundation™

Giving USA is a public outreach initiative of Giving USA Foundation™, which was established by the Giving Institute to advance philanthropy through research and education. Headquartered in Chicago, the Foundation publishes data and trends about charitable giving through its seminal publication, Giving USA, which has documented who gives what to whom for more than 50 years, and quarterly newsletters on philanthropy-related topics. To learn more visit www.givinginstitute.org.

How to obtain Giving USA 2013

Giving USA is the longest running and most comprehensive report on American philanthropy. A free executive summary of Giving USA 2013 can be downloaded online at www.givingusareports.org. Other products include the complete report; Giving USA Spotlight – quarterly research reports; and PowerPoint presentations for board meetings. Use the code CAMS1131 to receive 10% off any Giving USA products. 

Join the Conversation!

You can follow and join in the conversation on Twitter using the tag #GivingUSA2013.  

Campbell & Company is holding Giving USA programs in Chicago, Cleveland, Los Angeles, Silicon Valley, and Washington, DC, as well as a national webinar.

To learn more about our events, click here

Campbell & Company is a national consulting firm offering advancement planning, fundraising, communications and executive search services for nonprofit organizations in the education, health and medicine, arts and culture, environment, social service, and professional society fields.

Through thirty-seven years and thousands of engagements, Campbell & Company has helped nonprofit organizations anticipate and manage the challenges of the philanthropic marketplace. The company maintains offices in Chicago, Los Angeles, Portland, the San Francisco Bay Area and Washington, DC. For more information, please telephone (877) 957-0000 toll free, email info@campbellcompany.com or visit www.campbellcompany.com.

Building a Strong, Compelling and Consistent Case for Support

  
  
  

writingIn Case Development 201, Director of Communications Consulting Andrew Brommel offers  a collection of practical, immediately applicable  “tips and tricks” for building a strong, compelling, and consistent case for support.

For Brommel, an organization’s case for support is ultimately “your message to your donors—why should they give to your organization?”  He asserts that, “If this is all we ever thought about with a case for support, we’d be fine.”

Just as a case for support should be comprehensive in reflecting an organization’s vision, it should be a collective effort—one that engages Board members, staff, and leadership in the composing and shaping process. Messaging, Brommel argues, is “the most important. It’s the core … This is where your case comes from, and everything else we’re talking about is secondary to this.”

Effective messaging should express only one key idea per message, and should have an edge or make an assertion—not “ a statement of something this is universally, obviously true.” Brommel asserts that, in the non-profit sector, “we probably do too much writing, and not enough messaging.”

Two key benefits of establishing, clear, consistent messaging is that everyone in your organization, from volunteers to Board members, is pulling from the same unified, agreed-upon points, keeping communications consistent. In addition, these messages are endlessly versatile, and are easily transferrable to writing documents, talking points, and PowerPoint, video, or iPad presentations.

As a sample format for these messages, Brommel suggests you “throw a headline up there, and give it a few supporting points.” While the headline takes a position, each supporting point will elaborate on and clarify this position.

To write effective, clear messaging of your own, try this process:

  • Write 3-5 messages that simply “get your donor from Point A to Point B,” or from a lack of engagement to deep involvement.

  • To start, establish that an issue exists, and why it matters

  • Then, credential your organization as an effective institution to address the issue. Use this message as an opportunity to differentiate yourself from other organizations with similar missions

  • Next, assure potential donors that you have a plan in place that will enact real change

  • Remember, that you can often make a stronger statement by saying less

In the following examples, Brommel uses pairs of weaker and stronger messages to demonstrate how to build the most effective, specific messages for your organization:

1. Have conviction. Make a strong statement.

Weak: Our university helps students build the skills they need to become leaders.

Stronger: We believe every student has the power to lead.

2. It’s not about you. It’s about the people you serve.

Weak: We believe our community needs a healthcare provider committed to caring for us all.

Stronger: We believe everyone in our community deserves great healthcare.

3. Think voiceover, not prose. Short and to the point.

Weak: Among all the ways we can invest in our school’s future, the endowment is the most important, ultimately surpassing the impact of capital and program investments.

Stronger: The endowment is the most important investment we can make in our school’s future.

4. Don’t say everything. Say what matters.

Weak: As a nonprofit, community-based organization, we rely on the philanthropic support of our donors and neighbors to make our work possible.

Stronger: Only you can make our work possible.

For more helpful tips on developing a strong case for support, including use of stories and statistics, the three crucial levels to think about in all case development, and more specific examples, watch Andrew Brommel’s webinar, Case Development 201, here.

Questions? Contact Andrew Brommel at andrew.brommel@campbellcompany.com.

Campbell & Company Announces First Look: Giving USA 2013

  
  
  

Campbell & Company announces a series of dynamic events around the forthcoming Giving USA 2013 report, which will be released at 12:00 a.m. ET, on Tuesday, June 18, 2013.

Giving USA 2013 series of events will give you a powerful tool for understanding and navigating the current philanthropic environment. You will learn about broad and sector-specific philanthropic trends, potential opportunities and challenges going forward, and implications for your fundraising goals and strategies.

The First Look events will include:


Join in and follow the conversation on Twitter using the tag #GivingUSA2013.

Campbell & Company is a proud sponsor of Giving USA. Giving USA 2013, was compiled by The Center on Philanthropy at Indiana University for the Giving USA Foundation.
 

About Campbell & Company

Campbell & Company is a national consulting firm offering advancement planning, fundraising, marketing communications and executive search services to nonprofit organizations in nearly every sector. Through thirty-six years and more than a thousand engagements, we have helped our clients anticipate and manage the challenges of the philanthropic marketplace. Our offices are located in Chicago, Portland, Los Angeles, the San Francisco Bay Area and Washington, DC. For more information, please call toll-free (877) 957-0000, email info@campbellcompany.com or visit www.campbellcompany.com.

New Study: CDO Confidential - What CDOs Want You To Know About Retention

  
  
  

 A National Study on Nonprofit Chief Development Officer Retention

Chicago, IL - A newly released study CDO Confidential: What CDOs Want You to Know about Retention reveals that unrealistic expectations set by management have reduced the average Chief Development Officer (CDO) tenure to one to two years. Other factors include a lack of sufficient resources and cooperation among CDOs, CEOs and Boards. Campbell & Company, a national nonprofit consulting and executive search firm, recently completed a nationwide survey to understand the reasons behind this trend. CDO Confidential received responses from more than 400 Chief Development Officers and Chief Executive Officers to gain multiple perspectives. The sample included organizations with a wide range of missions, budgets, staff sizes and geographic areas.  

“This study shows that the CDO retention is not an insulated issue,” says Marian Alexander DeBerry, Director, Executive Search at Campbell & Company. “Shorter tenure in leading development roles not only leads to difficulty maintaining donor relationships, but also hinders the development and execution of long-term fundraising strategies. The implications of having short tenure are vast ranging from attracting and evaluating talent to onboarding to succession planning and require a wider, more in-depth dialogue with all parties involved.”  

Key findings include:

The report, CDO Confidential: What CDOs Want You to Know about Retention describes four main challenges:

Short tenure

Fifty-two percent (52%) of CDO served one to two years in their most recent position, confirming anecdotal evidence of shorter tenures.  

Unrealistic expectations

CDOConfidential

CDOs (75%) and CEOs (62%) cited unrealistic expectations are the number one reason behindCDO turnover.  

Reasons for departure

Twenty-eight percent (28%) of CDOs cited their organization’s lack of understanding of development as a reason for their most recent departure.  

Inadequate resources

Fifty-eight percent (58%) of CDOs felt they did not have the resources to do their job effectively, and twenty-nine percent (29%) of CDOs indicated professional development as their primary need.  

Click here to access the CDO Confidential report.

Campbell & Company is holding a series of conversations to discuss strategies to lengthen CDO tenure. Tips and strategies from these conversations will be released in future articles.

  • On Wednesday, April 24, at 12:00 PM CST Andrew Smerczak-Zorza, Consultant, Executive Search, led a panel discussion regarding the results of the survey during a Campbell & Company webinar.

  • On Wednesday, May 22, from 8:00 - 10:30 AM CST, Marian Alexander DeBerry, Director, Executive Search together with CompassPoint, will discuss the findings of two independent surveys, CDO Confidential and UnderDeveloped, during a luncheon at the Donors Forum.

Additional Resources

About Campbell & Company

Campbell & Company’s Executive Search team connects organizations with visionary leaders who can drive continued growth. We pay careful attention to the nuances and complexities of each client and draw on our extensive networks to find the ideal fit. Campbell & Company maintains offices in Chicago, Portland, Los Angeles, the San Francisco Bay Area and Washington, DC. For more information, please call toll-free (877) 957-0000, email info@campbellcompany.com or visit campbellcompany.com.

Edith Falk Quoted in Crain’s on the Price of Board Membership

  
  
  

Each year, board members face the required “give-or-gets”— the stated minimum annual donations board members either must give out of their own pockets or solicit from a corporation or well-heeled friend.

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The give-or-gets guarantee a revenue stream each year and help ensure that board members   are invested in the organization and its mission. Fundraising experts predominantly praise give-or-gets as a sound nonprofit tool. However, there are drawbacks and not every nonprofit has the give-or-get policy.

Edith Falk, Chair of Campbell & Company, recently gave her take on how nonprofits use the give-or-get tool with Crain’s Chicago Business. "Some are very squeamish about putting a dollar amount there," says Edith Falk, Chair of Campbell & Company, a Chicago-based consultant to nonprofits. Ones that do "can be reluctant to publicize it," Ms. Falk says, fearing "unintentional consequences," for instance appearing too elite—or not elite enough.

For the complete story and a sampling of give-or-gets from nine local nonprofits click here.

International Forum to Discuss Communication Challenges

  
  
  

On Friday, March 1, the newly formed International Forum, sponsored by Campbell & Company and in collaboration with the UN Foundation, will meet for the third time in Washington, D.C.,International Forum to discuss communication challenges and best practices for effective communication for international development organizations.

The discussion will be led by John Bender, Editor, The Nature Conservancy (TNC); Negin Janati, Senior Communications Officer, UN Foundation (Nothing But Nets and Million Moms); Rebecca Milner, VP for Institutional Advancement, International Medical Corps; and Andrew Brommel, Director of Communications Consulting, Campbell & Company.

In August 2012, Campbell & Company’s Washington D.C. team created the International Forum to give D.C.-area international development executives and senior fundraisers opportunities to network and discuss their common challenges. The Forum began with a mid-September breakfast attended by nearly two dozen directors and chief advancement officers from a cross section of organizations that fundraise domestically and internationally to support global causes.

Each breakfast meeting has a different topic and draws on pertinent issues facing the international development sector.

For questions concerning the international group in D.C., please contact dirk.sellers@campbellcompany.com.

CDO Confidential: What CDOs Want You to Know About Retention - Upcoming Webinar

  
  
  

Nonprofit chief development officers (CDOs) REgWebinarCDOimg1play a crucial role at their organizations and institutions, driving fundraising growth and philanthropic support, stewarding the board members, helping define organizational strategy, advising the Head, and shaping a range of policies.

On Wednesday, April 24, at 12:00 PM CST Andrew Smerczak-Zorza, Consultant, Executive Search will present qualitative and quantitative findings from a nation-wide survey regarding chief development officer retention conducted by Campbell & Company. Mr. Smerczak-Zorza will lead a panel discussion regarding the results of the survey, as well as panelists’ experiences at their current and past organizations.

Register for the CDO Confidential webinar.

About Campbell & Company

Campbell & Company is a national consulting firm offering advancement planning, fundraising, marketing communications and executive search services to nonprofit organizations in nearly every sector. Through thirty-six years and more than a thousand engagements, we have helped our clients anticipate and manage the challenges of the philanthropic marketplace. Our offices are located in Chicago, Boston, Portland, Los Angeles, the San Francisco Bay Area and Washington, DC. For more information, please call toll-free (877) 957-0000, email info@campbellcompany.com or visit www.campbellcompany.com.

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