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CDO Confidential: A Report on Recommendations for CDO Retention

  
  
  

CDO

The right fit between a Chief Development Officer and a nonprofit organization necessitates common goals, a shared vision, and open, consistent communication. In spite of these widely acknowledged truths, however, for the  last ten years many CDO tenures have become notably short-lived. 

Campbell & Company conducted a nationwide survey to examine the underlying causes of this trend. In follow-up webinars, breakfasts, and roundtable discussions, the Campbell & Company Executive Search team, along with 6 contributing past or present nonprofit CDOs, delved deeper into this phenomenon to better understand the factors that ultimately shape CDO job satisfaction. Based on these conversations, Campbell & Company has compiled a series of helpful strategies and tactics, sound bites from our discussions, and inserts with additional information to help guide both prospective and newly hired CDOs and the organizations seeking to hire and retain them.

For the complete article, click here.

International Forum to Discuss Hiring Trends

  
  
  

 InternationalForum

 

Campbell & Company is excited to kick off the 2013-2014 program for the International Forum on Friday, October 4 at the United Nations Foundation at 11:30am ET in Washington, DC. 

The first luncheon will discuss hiring trends in the international sector. Discussion leaders will include:

Jen Kim Field, Executive Director of Global Partnerships and Marketing, UN Foundation; Karen Ziffer, Director, GAIN; and Marian Alexander DeBerry, Director, Executive Search, Campbell & Company.

In August 2012, Campbell & Company's Washington DC team created the International Forum to give DC-area international development executives and senior fundraisers opportunities to network and discuss their common challenges. Each meeting has a different topic and draws on pertinent issues facing the international development sector.

For questions concerning the international group or if you would like to be added to the invite list, please contact Sarah Barnes.

Collins Group Joins Forces with Campbell & Company

  
  
  

Thursday, September 12, 2013 - Campbell & Company is excited to announce that Collins Group, a Seattle-based fundraising consulting firm, is now a division of Campbell & Company. 

Collins Group, which will keep its name, will continue to be based in Seattle in close proximity to nonprofits throughout the Northwest. This union will strengthen the capabilities and talents of both firms as they continue to offer outstanding services to nonprofit institutions across the region and throughout the country. 

"We at Campbell & Company are truly excited about coming together with Collins Group. By joining two firms with long histories of outstanding client service, we believe both organizations will be immeasurably strengthened," states Peter Fissinger, President & Chief Executive Officer, Campbell & Company. "Collins Group has an already-outstanding reputation. While Collins Group clients will continue to receive service from their consultants, they will now have access to services not previously provided by Collins. We are all looking forward to a stronger future together." 

Combined, Campbell & Company and Collins Group have provided exemplary consulting services to over 2,000 nonprofit organizations in the past three decades. This extensive experience informs the work of each firm and benefits both current and future nonprofit clients. In addition to the services that Collins Group offers, Northwest organizations will have access to services that Campbell & Company provides, such as executive search, strategic information services, and donor communications and marketing. 

"Together, with Campbell & Company, we will be able to offer Northwest nonprofits an expanded continuum of advancement services to realize their visions. The combination of personalized consultation with access to additional services offers value to current and future Collins Group clients. It's a win-win for both firms and for nonprofits," states Aggie Sweeney, President & CEO, Collins Group.

About Campbell & Company

Campbell & Company is a national consulting firm offering advancement planning, fundraising, communications and executive search services for nonprofit organizations in the education, health and medicine, arts and culture, environment, social service, and professional society fields.

Through thirty-plus years and thousands of engagements, we have helped nonprofit organizations anticipate and manage the challenges of the philanthropic marketplace. With offices around the country, Campbell & Company brings you the benefits of local knowledge, and national best practices.

Please visit www.campbellcompany.com for more information.

About Collins Group

Collins Group, a Seattle-based fundraising consulting firm, has served nonprofit organizations in Washington, Oregon, Alaska, Idaho, and Montana for more than 30 years. We support the missions of our clients through our collective expertise and creativity in strategic fundraising.

Our campaign clients - who have raised more than $1 billion since 2000 - use our recommendations to fine-tune their plans, engage their leadership, and inspire donors to understand the power of their philanthropy.

Please visit www.collinsgroup.com for more information.

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Eight Important Trends Impacting Development in Higher Education

  
  
  
higher edu trendsDr. Loren Anderson, whose career has spanned three institutions, seven development campaigns, and almost $500 million in fundraising, shares his observations on development trends that are impacting higher education.

During his 20-year term as President of Pacific Lutheran University (PLU) in Parkland, Washington, the university gained national stature in global education, sustainability, and helping students explore their passion and purpose in life and their role as world citizens. Dr. Anderson holds a B.A. degree from Concordia College in Moorhead, MN; an M.A. in speech from Michigan State University; and a Ph.D. from the University of Michigan in communication theory and research. 

As a spokesperson for private higher education, Dr. Anderson served as a member and board chair of the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities and of the Independent Colleges of Washington. He served as a board member of the Council of Independent Colleges, the American Council on Education, and the Institute for the International Education of Students. 

1. Donor pyramids are taller and narrower.

The 80-20 donor pyramid of giving that once described development campaigns has given way to a 90-10, sometimes a 95-5, model. This change reflects the concentration of wealth and donor capacity in our society. For example, The 50 donors on The Chronicle of Philanthropy’s annual list of the most generous Americans gave an average of $61 million in 2011, compared with $39.6 million the previous year. Collectively, these philanthropists gave $10.4 billion to charitable organizations in 2012.

In the past, donors who would make a $100,000 gift would be likely to make the same contribution over the next three to five years. “Now there are fewer larger long-term pledge gifts and more smaller one-time gifts,” indicates Dr. Anderson, “We are also seeing a decline in middle range gifts in the amount of $25,000 to $200,000.”  

Establishing significant relationships with those donors who have the capacity to make very large gifts is thus more important than ever. “Organizations need to focus and carefully prioritize major gift work, as the success of development campaigns increasingly depends on this small and very generous group of donors,” says Dr. Anderson.

2. Fewer donors are willing to make large 3 to 5 year pledges.

The dramatic economic swings of the past two decades have impacted donor confidence in the future and, as a result, more major gift donors are choosing to make one-time significant gifts – rather than a three to five year pledge. This is especially true for donors who fund their contributions from annual earnings, as opposed to accumulated assets.  

As Dr. Anderson notes, “this trend toward one-time gifts and away from multi-year pledges, contributes to the taller/narrower donor pyramid described earlier, as the mid-major gifts in the $25,000 range and up become more difficult to find.”  

3. Donors are reserving their significant gifts for institutions and organizations with whom they have truly significant relationships.

Donors are increasingly concentrating their significant giving to those organizations they feel most strongly about, as opposed to spreading their giving across a larger number of nonprofits, a trend which commentators have attributed to shifts in the economic climate and philanthropic culture. 

“Nonprofits used to expect that donors who gave once would give again, but that has changed as philanthropy has become a more important part of our culture,” he explains. “People with resources are used to being approached by many organizations and they must make choices. They’ll quite naturally choose the organizations they know best and feel most closely toward.”  

4. Donor designations are more frequent and more precise.

“Donors increasingly want to designate their gifts to a specific project or cause,” explains Dr. Anderson. “Instead of supporting the next capital project, they want to see the impact their support has for beneficiaries like individual students or children.”  

This trend changes the structure of campaigns. Campaigns can really package a series of individual projects like a building, endowment, and scholarships. Nonprofits and their development teams need to review their campaign planning and let donors choose specific projects as opposed to making broad appeals.

5. Women are playing a much larger role, as donors and as leaders.  Couples are making joint decisions about their philanthropy.  Charities are behind the curve.

Women are more involved in the world of philanthropy as board members, volunteers and development professionals. Most importantly, the number of women donors has increased. A study by the Lilly Family School of Philanthropy - Women Give 2010 - found that women at all income levels have the desire and capacity for giving and do give frequently. For instance, of 2,500 households headed by single males or single females, the women were more likely to donate and almost always gave more.

Couples’ philanthropic decision making has also changed. “It used to be that Bill would take Joe to the golf course, and Joe would decide what he and his wife are going to give,” says Dr. Anderson. “Today, couples make philanthropic decisions together, which means nonprofits have to appeal to the values and interests of both persons.”    

6. A new "investment culture" increasingly shapes our attitudes (and behavior) toward philanthropy and our expectations regarding charities.

An increasing number of donors make decisions using a model that considers the “return” on their philanthropic investment. “The attitude that we have about investing for financial return has influenced our attitudes about giving,” says Dr. Anderson. Organizations need to develop stronger cases for philanthropic support, maintain transparency around their budgets and institute professional reporting standards that demonstrate their efficiency and effectiveness.  Donor expectations for more detailed reporting require charities to rethink their management systems, financial management and investment programs.    

7. Volunteer involvement in development work is decreasing while the reliance on professional staff is increasing.

According to the Federal Agency for Service and Volunteering in 2011, the number of volunteers reached its highest level in five years, as 64.3 million Americans volunteered with an organization, an increase of 1.5 million from 2010. But finding effective fundraising volunteers is a growing challenge. “People who will roll up their sleeves and become directly involved in development work are few in number” says Dr. Anderson.  He predicts a continuing trend toward the use of development professionals in lieu of a reduced role for volunteers.  

8. In higher education: loan payments are displacing alumni contributions for a whole generation of younger alums.

Students and their parents struggle with student loans, which recently exceeded a combined total of $1 trillion. In a sluggish economy and job market, loan payments have taken priority over donations. Dr. Anderson feels the philanthropic community has not been sensitive to these trends. “Every time we ask these young graduates for a financial gift, we are asking them to do something they cannot do,” he says, “We are, in a sense, training them to say no to us.”

Dr. Anderson advocates rethinking our approach to young alumni, who very often want to donate their time and expertise as volunteers. Examples may include speaking or helping students find internships. “We need to develop a tradition of saying yes,” he explains, “so that when these alumni are ready and able to give financially, a relationship, and a tradition of “giving” had already been built.”

For a more in-depth look at the higher education industry trends and changes please follow Campbell & Company’s blog and our webinar calendar here.

The Campbell & Company Higher Education Team understands the context in which higher education institutions operate, and create a structure and process within that context, tailored to your community, that allows philanthropy to grow. For 37 years, we have successfully partnered with a range of higher education institutions, including large public universities, mid-majors, private liberal arts colleges and community colleges. We also draw on our staffs’ experience to develop initiatives for specific higher education segments including Historically Black Colleges and Universities and professional schools.

Campbell & Company maintains offices in Chicago, Los Angeles, Portland, the San Francisco Bay Area, and Washington, DC. For more information, please telephone (877) 957-0000 toll free, email info@campbellcompany.com or visit www.campbellcompany.com.  

The National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) Funding Reduced

  
  
  

In an unexpected move, The National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) funding was reduced by 49% this week. The proposed reduction, which is markedly disproportionate to the overall 19% reduction in funding to the entire Interior bill, passed with a 7-4 vote by the House Interior Appropriations Committee on July 23rd, and will take effect in FY14.

In advance of this development, House Committee leadership had previously declared its intentions to scale back on “lower-priority, or ‘nice-to-have’ programs” in favor of “vital programs that directly affect the safety and well-being of Americans.”

While the bill may still change significantly after it goes before the full House Appropriations committee as early as next week, further action on the Interior bill is highly unpredictable, as the House and Senate must complete appropriations bills in advance of FY13 on September 30.

Among its many priorities, the NEA supports public access to the arts, arts education, and the preservation of vital classical works. It is critical to voice your support for the arts now to your elected officials—urge your members of Congress to support the NEA today

Speak Up Now to Support the NEA

About Campbell & Company
Campbell & Company is a national consulting firm offering advancement planning, fundraising, marketing communications and executive search services to nonprofit organizations in nearly every sector. Through thirty-seven years and more than a thousand engagements, we helped our clients anticipate and manage the challenges of the philanthropic marketplace. Our offices are located in Chicago, Portland, Los Angeles, the San Francisco Bay Area and Washington, DC. For more information, please call toll-free (877) 957-0000, email info@campbellcompany.com or visit www.campbellcompany.com

Giving USA 2013 Healthcare Snapshot

  
  
  

The recently released Giving USA 2013 report describes broad trends in healthcare philanthropy. Here, we break down important trends from the report and make broad recommendations for healthcare organizations as they build their fundraising programs. We welcome your thoughts and questions; please don’t hesitate to contact Adam Wilhelm at adam.wilhelm@campbellcompany.com.   

Key findings for healthcare providers include:

  • Individual giving constitutes the vast majority of American philanthropy; accordingly, individuals such as grateful patients, family members and others represent the bulk of healthcare supporters.

  • Between 2010 and 2012, giving to health grew 5.6 percent. This is compared with growth in overall giving of 7.9 percent (in current dollars) over the same period. Industry observers have attributed this slower growth to volatility in the healthcare sector due to healthcare reform and accompanying trends. 

We recommend that healthcare organizations:

  • Build a “high impact” fundraising program:  Fundraising programs should focus on securing leadership and major gifts. Doing so requires strategic investment in fundraising staff and systems, as well as training for leadership, staff and volunteers; however, such a program almost always provides the greatest returns for hospitals, healthcare systems and other healthcare providers.

  • Develop a powerful case for support:  With the continued uncertainty in the healthcare sector, organizations must develop clear, concise and consistent case that describes their vision, impact and need for philanthropic support. Stakeholders at all level should contribute to the development of case messages and be prepared to share them with a range of prospective supporters.

We welcome your comments below. Want to learn more? Contact Adam Wilhelm, Senior Consultant, Campbell & Company.

 About the Campbell & Company Healthcare Practice 

The Campbell & Company Higher Education Team understands the context in which higher education institutions operate, and create a structure and process within that context, tailored to your community, that allows philanthropy to grow. For 37 years, we have successfully partnered with a range of higher education institutions, including large public universities, mid-majors, private liberal arts colleges and community colleges. We also draw on our staffs’ experience to develop initiatives for specific higher education segments including Historically Black Colleges and Universities and professional schools.

Campbell & Company maintains offices in Chicago, Los Angeles, Portland, the San Francisco Bay Area, Seattle and Washington, DC. For more information, please telephone (877)957-0000 toll free, email info@campbellcompany.com or visit www.campbellcompany.com.


Nonprofit Leaders Respond to Giving USA 2013 at Campbell & Company Events

  
  
  

Campbell & Company presented findings and analysis of Giving USA 2013, the annual report on philanthropy, to more than 1,100 nonprofit professionals at a national webinar and events in Chicago, Cleveland, Washington, DC, Milwaukee and Silicon Valley. 

The report found that American philanthropy continued its slow but steady recovery from the Great Recession in 2012; event panelists and participants found compelling reasons for optimism. For example, panelists observed that high-end giving has largely returned to normal levels and that the continued retirement of the Baby Boomer generation would likely drive future growth in giving.

Below, we summarize key insights shared in our national webinar and events.

Common Challenges

Many panelists and participants described the challenge of “having to do more with less,” in other words sustaining and growing their mission and fundraising programs with limited staffing, resources and budgets, while addressing donor concerns about supporting overhead costs. Others reported addressing questions of defining and reevaluating organizational identities in light of the changing marketplace and donor demographics, as well as a shift in engagement strategies to reach a new generation of philanthropists through the Internet and social media.

Keys to Success

Organizational representatives described steps their institutions had taken to ensure their sustainability and growth over the past year, including:

  • Maintaining a donor-centered focus in which organizations listen closely to their constituents and respond to their interests, motivations and needs
  • Building long-lasting philanthropic relationships with key individual and institutional donors to ensure mutual benefit
  • Crafting a powerful case for support, including concrete evidence of organizational impact, and tailoring it for distinct constituencies
  • Ensuring that online engagement strategies directed toward younger donors and prospects still incorporate personalized contact

A Call to Action

Panelists described how the nonprofit sector had been a powerful advocate against the charitable deduction cap, which threatened to significantly affect higher-level philanthropic giving, and encouraged organizations to continue raising their voices as debates over tax policy continue. They also urged organizations and individuals to focus on sequestration, the effects of which have not been directly experienced by many organizations. 

Campbell & Company thanks all of the organizations and non-profit leaders for their involvement in the Giving USA events. Click here for a list of all of the events.

If you would like to receive information about Campbell & Company’s future Giving USA events, please visit our website at www.campbellcompany.com and sign up for our email list.

Click here to listen to Campbell & Company’s Giving USA 2013 webinar.

About Campbell & Company
Campbell & Company is a national consulting firm offering advancement planning, fundraising, marketing communications and executive search services to nonprofit organizations in nearly every sector. Through thirty-seven years and more than a thousand engagements, we helped our clients anticipate and manage the challenges of the philanthropic marketplace. Our offices are located in Chicago, Portland, Los Angeles, the San Francisco Bay Area and Washington, DC. For more information, please call toll-free (877) 957-0000, email info@campbellcompany.com or visit www.campbellcompany.com.  

About Giving USA FoundationTM 
Giving USA is a public outreach initiative of Giving USA Foundation™, which was established by the Giving Institute to advance philanthropy through research and education. Headquartered in Chicago, the Foundation publishes data and trends about charitable giving through its seminal publications, GUSA, which has documented who gives what to whom for more than 50 years, and quarterly newsletters on philanthropy-related topics. To learn more, visit www.giviginstitute.org.

How to Obtain Giving USA 2013
Giving USA is the longest running and most comprehensive report on American philanthropy. A free executive summary of Giving USA 2013 can be downloaded online at www.givingusareports.org. Other products include the complete report; Giving USA Spotlight – quarterly research reports; and PowerPoint presentations for board meetings. Use the code CAMS1131 to receive 10% off any Giving USA products.
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Giving USA 2013: Live from NPR Studio 1

  
  
  

Washington, DC: Campbell & Company with partner AFP DC recently presented findings and analysis of Giving USA 2013 at NPR’s stunning Studio 1. Monique Hanson and Stacy Palmer Campbell & Company Vice President Jeffrey Wilklow presented key findings from the report to an audience of 100, before panelists Monique Hanson, Chief Development Officer at NPR and Stacy Palmer, Editor, The Chronicle of Philanthropy shared their insights into the report’s implications.

“We are incredibly grateful to NPR for opening their incredible studio to us for the Giving USA 2013 presentation and panel discussion,” said Mr. Wilklow, “and we value the time Monique and Stacy took to share their knowledge and experience. Both are remarkably capable professionals and deep thinkers on all things philanthropic.” 

The FindingsDC Crowd Shot

Giving USA 2013 found that American philanthropy continued its slow but steady recovery from the Great Recession in 2012; event panelists found compelling reasons for optimism. Stacy Palmer observed that high-end giving has largely returned to normal levels and that the continued retirement of the Baby Boomer generation would likely drive future growth in giving. She also described significant growth in online giving (15 percent), which is expected to account for an increasingly significant portion of nonprofits’ philanthropic revenue in coming years.

Key Trends

Monique Hanson described how nonprofit Boards have become more involved in both prospect research and stewardship, and how development staff have grown increasingly statistics driven, relying on analyses of prospect capacity and giving likelihood to prioritize their efforts and a range of metrics to assess their performance. She also summarized NPR’s efforts focusing its development program on the “donor experience,” assigning each key donor and prospect to a single relationship manager to ensure seamless interaction with the network.

A Call to Action

Both panelists described how the nonprofit sector had been a powerful advocate against the charitable deduction cap, which threatened to significantly affect higher-level philanthropic giving, and encouraged organizations to continue raising their voices as debates over tax policy continue. They also urged organizations and individuals to focus on sequestration, the effects of which have not been directly experienced by many organizations. 

If you would like to receive information about Campbell & Company’s future Giving USA events, please visit our website at www.campbellcompany.com and sign up for our email list.

Click here to listen to Campbell & Company’s Giving USA 2013 webinar.

About Campbell & Company
Campbell & Company is a national consulting firm offering advancement planning, fundraising, marketing communications and executive search services to nonprofit organizations in nearly every sector. Through thirty-seven years and more than a thousand engagements, we helped our clients anticipate and manage the challenges of the philanthropic marketplace. Our offices are located in Chicago, Portland, Los Angeles, the San Francisco Bay Area and Washington, DC. For more information, please call toll-free (877) 957-0000, email info@campbellcompany.com or visit www.campbellcompany.com.  

About Giving USA FoundationTM 
Giving USA is a public outreach initiative of Giving USA Foundation™, which was established by the Giving Institute to advance philanthropy through research and education. Headquartered in Chicago, the Foundation publishes data and trends about charitable giving through its seminal publications, GUSA, which has documented who gives what to whom for more than 50 years, and quarterly newsletters on philanthropy-related topics. To learn more, visit www.giviginstitute.org.

How to Obtain Giving USA 2013
Giving USA is the longest running and most comprehensive report on American philanthropy. A free executive summary of Giving USA 2013 can be downloaded online at www.givingusareports.org. Other products include the complete report; Giving USA Spotlight – quarterly research reports; and PowerPoint presentations for board meetings. Use the code CAMS1131 to receive 10% off any Giving USA products.

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Giving to Education Trends

  
  
  

A Synopsis from Giving USA and the 2012 Voluntary Support of Education Survey 

Giving USA 2013 reflects the results of the Council on Aid to Education’s (CAE’s) 2012 Voluntary Support of Education (VSE) survey. Like the economy, giving has continued to recover from the recession at a slow but steady pace.

Key findings include:

  • According to the CAE VSE survey, total FY2012 giving to education was $31 billion, an increase of 2.3 percent from the previous fiscal year. This is just short of the historic high of $31.6 billion in FY2008 before the economic collapse.

  • Giving USA 2013 found that, in calendar year 2012, educational organizations received $41.33 billion in total support, a 7 percent increase from 2011 and 13 percent of total philanthropy in 2012. Education now represents the second largest philanthropic sector, on par with human services and behind religion.

  • Higher education endowment growth leveled off following the big increase of 16.7 percent in FY2011, remaining essentially unchanged in FY2012. 

Alumni Giving

Traditionally, alumni giving has provided the largest share of education support; however, alumni participation declined in FY2012 for the tenth straight year, with only 9.2 percent of alumni giving nationwide compared to13.2 percent in FY2002. Historic levels of student debt have contributed to this trend, and the number of alumni of record has disproportionately increased compared to the number of higher education donors.

In FY2007, foundations supplanted alumni as the largest source of education support, which continued into 2012, with 27.9 percent of higher education giving coming from foundations compared to 25.3 percent from alumni, reflecting the continued growth of family foundations which made up 37.2 percent of all foundation giving in FY2012.  

Recommendations

Family foundations are vehicles for giving from wealthy individuals, and institutions should use the principles of individual relationship building to cultivate their support. Annual giving programs should continue to explore various segmentation strategies and focus on dollars raised, numbers of donors and renewal rates. Institutions should find ways to engage recent graduates in areas other than giving so those with heavy debt remain connected until they are better able to make annual fund gifts.

Questions?

Please email Bruce Matthews

American Giving Continues Slow, Consistent Recovery

  
  
  

Americans gave an estimated $316.23 billion to charitable causes in 2012, representing 3.5 percent growth (1.5 percent adjusted for inflation) from the previous year, according to Giving USA 2013: The Annual Report on Philanthropy. While this continues the trend of growth that we have observed since the recession, the current pace suggests that it could take another six to seven years for giving to return to pre-2008 levels. Because giving closely tracks the economy at large, key economic factors (personal income, personal consumption, employment levels and investment markets) could alter this pace and the overall level of giving further.

"Overall, growth in giving was restrained. But there are signs that individuals, the largest source of giving, are beginning to consider more asset-based giving. This development could be quite positive going forward," says Peter Fissinger, President & Chief Executive Officer of Campbell & Company, a national fundraising consulting and executive search firm. "By continuing to strategically build relationships with their best donors and prospects, nonprofits can help ensure their sustainability and growth in these challenging times."

Other key findings from Giving USA 2013 include:

Giving by Source

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  • Individual giving rose to $228.93 billion, a 3.9 percent increase (1.9 percent adjusted for inflation) over 2011. This figure may have been checked by economic uncertainty, which resulted from contrasting positive and negative indicators, including growth in the S&P 500, slightly higher home values, lower unemployment and reduced gas prices coupled with budget and tax reform debates.

  • Corporate giving, including cash gifts, in-kind contributions, and corporate foundation grants and gifts, rose to an estimated $18.15 billion, a 12.2 percent increase (9.9 percent adjusted for inflation) from 2011 levels. Significant in-kind gifts from major pharmaceutical companies drove an appreciable portion of this growth.
     

Giving by Sector

Giving by Sector

About Giving USA Foundation™

Giving USA is a public outreach initiative of Giving USA Foundation™, which was established by the Giving Institute to advance philanthropy through research and education. Headquartered in Chicago, the Foundation publishes data and trends about charitable giving through its seminal publication, Giving USA, which has documented who gives what to whom for more than 50 years, and quarterly newsletters on philanthropy-related topics. To learn more visit www.givinginstitute.org.

How to obtain Giving USA 2013

Giving USA is the longest running and most comprehensive report on American philanthropy. A free executive summary of Giving USA 2013 can be downloaded online at www.givingusareports.org. Other products include the complete report; Giving USA Spotlight – quarterly research reports; and PowerPoint presentations for board meetings. Use the code CAMS1131 to receive 10% off any Giving USA products. 

Join the Conversation!

You can follow and join in the conversation on Twitter using the tag #GivingUSA2013.  

Campbell & Company is holding Giving USA programs in Chicago, Cleveland, Los Angeles, Silicon Valley, and Washington, DC, as well as a national webinar.

To learn more about our events, click here

Campbell & Company is a national consulting firm offering advancement planning, fundraising, communications and executive search services for nonprofit organizations in the education, health and medicine, arts and culture, environment, social service, and professional society fields.

Through thirty-seven years and thousands of engagements, Campbell & Company has helped nonprofit organizations anticipate and manage the challenges of the philanthropic marketplace. The company maintains offices in Chicago, Los Angeles, Portland, the San Francisco Bay Area and Washington, DC. For more information, please telephone (877) 957-0000 toll free, email info@campbellcompany.com or visit www.campbellcompany.com.

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